photo of microgreens
Though tiny in size, microgreens are packed with flavor and high in nutritional value, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

URBANA, Ill. – When space is a limiting factor, gardeners may consider changing their strategy from big backyards to micro gardens. Microgreens are tiny variations of fresh vegetables, herbs, and greens. 

Though tiny in size, microgreens are packed with flavor and high in nutritional value, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. In USDA tests, microgreens contained about five times greater levels of vitamins and carotenoids than their corresponding mature plant.

Microgreens are harvested from seven to 14 days after germination, after the cotyledons have developed but prior to the expansion of leaves. Harvesting is simple; the seedlings are clipped, just above the soil, says James Theuri, University of Illinois Extension local food system educator.

A free online webinar at noon Aug. 6 will review the nutritional value of microgreens and how their presentation adds to plating appeal and texture of meals. "Urban dwellers, small-space gardeners, and local food enthusiasts wishing to learn basic growing techniques should register before Aug. 4.

To request a special accommodation to participate in the webinar, contact Therui at jtheu50@illinois.edu or Laurie George, Illinois Extension local food educator, at ljgeorge@illinois.edu

SOURCEJames Theuri, Local Food Systems Small Farms Educator, Illinois Extension
SOURCE: Laurie George, Local Food Systems Small Farms Educator, Illinois Extension

ABOUT EXTENSION: Illinois Extension leads public outreach for the University of Illinois by translating research into action plans that allow Illinois families, businesses, and communities to solve problems, make informed decisions, and adapt to changes and opportunities.