Our sister blog "Know How, Know More" has been sharing stories of our CSA adventure this summer. CSA stands for "community supported agriculture," and we are having fun making recipes from our weekly box of local foods. We had some unusual foods, as well as found some fun ways to cook with familiar foods. Recently, we had eggplant in our box.

Nutrition

The main winter squashes I see sold in grocery stores are butternut, spaghetti, and acorn squashes. This summer, our office purchased a CSA (community supported agriculture) share from a local farmer.  Each week, we got a box of fruits, veggies, and herbs. Check out our sister blog "Know How, Know More" for recipes and information about the journey. Winter squash arrived in the last half of the CSA season, and we made some yummy recipes, including the one below.

Nutrition

If you missed the ketchup post, it should pair well with this post on mustard.

Mustard is considered an oilseed crop, which the USDA notes as "grains that are also valuable for the oil content they produce." The main seed varieties are yellow (or white), brown (or black), or oriental mustard. Yellow mustard seeds are commonly used in prepared mustards, like the condiment many of us use on sandwiches. Brown and oriental mustard seeds are spicier than yellow mustard seeds and often used to add spice and flavor in cooked dishes.

So many blog posts! So many foods highlighted! I was surprised to see I had not talked about green beans, a classic veggie!

Nutrition

One cup of cooked green beans contains around 45 calories, 10g carbohydrates, 4g fiber, 2g protein, and contains vitamins and minerals including vitamin A, vitamin K, folate, and potassium. Green beans are not a significant source of fat or sodium.

Have you noticed?  Winter tends to bring citrus fruits into season! While oranges are everywhere, don't forget about other citrus, including grapefruit.

Nutrition

Half a medium fresh grapefruit contains around 50 calories, 13g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, and vitamins and minerals including vitamin C, folate, potassium, and magnesium. Due to the pigment, red and pink grapefruit have vitamin A, while white grapefruit will have very little. Grapefruit is not a significant source of fat, protein, or sodium.

Many thanks to our intern, Terri Rupkey, for being the hand-model for the Summer Recipe Rehab recipes.

From fresh melons to main dish salads, light and healthier foods can appeal to us during the heat of summer. But not all summer recipes are so light. Desserts, mayonnaise-based salads, and grilled brats and burgers can be heavy on fat and calories. So head to the kitchen to make lightened versions of popular summer favorites.

It's nearly summer! The weather is better for cooking outside. What is your preferred seasoning for the grill: rubs, marinades, or sauces? Today, I want to explore barbecue (BBQ) sauces.

Nutrition

There are so many variations of BBQ sauce, which means the nutrition information will vary by brand and recipe. For this example, I used the standard reference BBQ sauce from the National Nutrient Database from the USDA.

This recipe is credited to UI Extension nutrition and wellness educator, Jenna Smith.  Read her original post and recipe at Spring for Lemons. And many thanks to our intern, Terri Rupkey, for being the hand-model for the Summer Recipe Rehab recipes.

Many thanks to our intern, Terri Rupkey, for being the hand-model for the Summer Recipe Rehab recipes and for suggesting this recipe.

Mayonnaise-based salads popular in summer, like potato or macaroni salad, can be heavy on calories and fat.  Compared to a typical potato salad recipe, this mocktato salad has more high-fiber vegetables with fewer carbohydrates.  The amount of dressing is less, which helps cut calories.  And by increasing the amount of mustard, we add more flavor, even with less of the dressing.

While very mild in flavor, rice is one of my favorite grains. It makes a great base for stir-fries, adds bulk to soup, and takes on fun flavors with any seasoning you add. (I sometimes mix peanut butter into cooked rice for a quick side dish.)

Nutrition

A 1/4 cup of dry brown rice (which cooks up to around 3/4 cup) contains around 170 calories, 35g carbohydrates, 1g fiber, 3g protein, and contains other vitamins and minerals, including folate and magnesium. Brown rice contains a small amount of fat and sodium.

Do you enjoy drinking your vegetables? And no, I am not referring to green smoothies. Today's post is on tomato juice. Let's save green smoothies and vegetable juice – a blend of veggies – for another day.

Nutrition

An 8-oz cup of tomato juice has around 40 calories, 9g carbohydrates, 1g fiber, 2g protein, and a variety of vitamins and minerals, including vitamins A and C and potassium. Tomato juice is not a significant source of fat.