According to university farm economists across the Midwest, 2019 is the year where farmers need to scrutinize their crop expenses, and see where they can cut costs to improve their net return per acre. Currently, the projected fall prices for corn and soybeans are mid-$3's and mid-$8's, respectively, is very close to the cost of production. In order to achieve profitability, production costs will need to be reduced.

It has been a wet April across parts of Illinois, and farmers are anxious about getting their crops planted.  Recent history since 2000, shows that late planting does not always lead to lower yields. Take for instance last year, when planting did not start till the very end of April and we had record corn and soybean yields or 2008 when planting did not start till May.
Two particularly troublesome pigweeds are Tall Waterhemp and Palmer Amaranth, which have and are continuing to develop resistance to herbicides. In Illinois, Tall Waterhemp is resistant to 6 different classes of herbicides and Palmer Amaranth is resistant to 3. If that is not bad enough, members of the pigweed or amaranth family can cross pollinate between species which aids in the rapid spread of resistance as well.