Amaryllis flowers are one of my absolute favorites, especially during the holiday season, but many wonder what to do with the plant once the beautiful bloom is done flowering. Do you toss it? Try to rebloom it again? Extension Master Gardener Coordinator, Sandy Mason, shared some great info on her blog several years ago that may help! The longer you keep a bulb, the bigger it gets and the more flowers it produces, so the effort can really be worth it!

This week's Plant of the Week immediately drew my attention while visiting the Sarah P. Duke Gardens in North Carolina last week. The interesting spines caught my eye right away! It's called Naranjilla (Solanum quitoense) and it's a member of the nightshade family, Solanaceae, which includes tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and potatoes.

I don't know about you, but I've been noticing that perennial hibiscus plants are looking awesome in the landscape these past few weeks!

Plant of the Week is back! It's been a bit of a hiatus, but I'm glad to be back sharing what plants I'm seeing that are noteworthy, growing in gardens across the state.

This week's Plant of the Week has always been a favorite of mine. Beardtongue (Penstemon digitalis) is a native perennial you'll find growing in prairies, fields, wood margins, open woods and along railroad tracks throughout the state. At a local garden center, you'll also find a variety of great cultivars available.

As gardeners, many of us like to relax in the backyard, taking time to enjoy our beautiful flowers, but why not bring those beautiful bloomers indoors to enjoy? Many showy flowers, grasses, and foliage are available to interplant into your existing garden beds, allowing you to harvest throughout the seasons.

As a floral designer, this week's Plant of the Week is a favorite of mine: Asiatic Lilies (Lilium sp). While visiting the gardens on the Macon County Master Gardener Garden Walk this past weekend, I noticed several gardens with Asiatic lilies blooming in full glory.