a mix of green herbs sit on a chopping block next to a large kitchen knife

The smells of Thanksgiving dinner highlight a holiday centered around family, friends, and giving thanks. Heartwarming and tempting, the aromas of freshly baked dishes would not be the same without the addition of herbs like thyme, sage, rosemary, and parsley.

This holiday season, consider herbs you could grow in your own garden or plant a container of herbs indoors for an uplifting scene of green and quick access to fresh flavor. 

A holiday wreath hangs on red barn doors

Imagine owning and running the business of your dreams, and not being in control of one of the most stressful aspects of a business: the cost of production. For many, this situation is not a fantasy, it is a reality.

According to recent USDA data, farm sector production expenses for farmers both large and small are almost 18 percent higher on average compared with this time last year.

In an environment of 40-year-high-inflation, farmers are experiencing increased risk in two of the five USDA-recognized categories of risk:

Red kuri, delicata, and acorn squash in wicker baskets with pie pumpkins.

Imagine your last visit to a beloved family home, arriving as a freshly baked pumpkin pie was pulled from the oven. If you take a moment, I bet you can almost smell it. 

Many people have this olfactory memory of the most well-known winter squash: the pie pumpkin. Others are also familiar with the smell or taste of pie pumpkin’s common cousins: spaghetti, acorn, and butternut squashes.

Bundles of white and pink flowers hang upside down to dry

Your garden's floral showcase may be ending but the flowers need not disappear. Extend the life of floral garden favorites by preserving them for indoor decor. The art of preserving flowers and plant materials has been practiced for hundreds of years; colonial Americans harvested and dried flowers to decorate their homes for the long winter season. In similar fashion to early American homes, dried flowers and foliage can be used to create wreaths, potpourri, vase arrangements, or other gifts.

Blue flower on green leaves

Red, white, and blue will make a statement on flagpoles, porches, street corners—even truck beds—this holiday weekend. Join the celebration, plant a festive garden of patriotic color around your flagpole or a red, white and blue front door container to celebrate Independence Day. The addition of blue flowers to your red and white garden is tricky to accomplish, only around 10% of the flowering plants on earth produce blue flowers, but the addition is certain to make a patriotic statement.

Two shovels laying in dirt

Your ambition to start your summer vegetable garden is stunting your tomato and pepper plants.

This Sunday, let Mom distract you from the gardening itch.

A row of cyclamens with red, white and pink flowers

Time is ticking to find that perfect Valentine’s Day gift for your loved ones. Instead of the go-to fresh floral arrangement, give a gift that someone can enjoy for many months. Flowering houseplants are great alternatives to traditional bouquets of cut flowers. With a little care and maintenance, these plants can thrive in your house or office and rebloom multiple times. A bonus to gifting these indoor plants, they can be moved outdoors to your garden or patio container once warmer temperatures arrive.

Millions of Poinsettias are bought each year as decoration and gifts. Sales continue to increase as people use the plant to create a festive atmosphere. Poinsettias are the epitome of Christmas time and reflect the holiday decorating trends.

While the traditional rich red Poinsettia in a 6-inch pot will garner the most sales, some of this year's Poinsettia trends might help inspire your holiday décor.

evergreen tree in field

The Thanksgiving meal has been had (hopefully with a local turkey and/or local produce) and now it’s time to start thinking about putting up a tree for Christmas. Did you grow up with a fake plastic tree like some of my friends did? If so, that’s ok, but there is another way.

assorted cut flowers in a wide mouth jar. credit:

Valentine’s Day is a day to celebrate love in the form of flowers. This holiday excites floral designers because they know every festive flower can generate a positive emotional response.

tree cookies hanging from woody vine

Anyone can make their holiday season a little more earth friendly with a new family tradition: recycling the tree!

LEGO sculpture of adult and child gardening together

Six Garden Gifts 

Gardening is a mindful practice that can only be sourced outside in the fresh air, with your hands in the dirt, creating a pallet of flowers and fruits. This past year, many new gardeners tested their skills while experienced gardeners stretched theirs. This year, gift the must-have gardening tools of the trade. 

holiday decor harvested from backyard

Decorating with fresh greenery is a treat for most gardeners getting ready for the holiday festivities. Some buy greens from a local garden center, but did you know you can harvest branches from evergreen conifers to use in your holiday décor?

red poinsettia with green tips in foreground of brilliant white holiday lighting

This holiday season, buy Poinsettias from local growers, and keep them vibrant with a few “don’ts” from a previous Poinsettia greenhouse grower.

Millions of Poinsettias are bought each year as decoration and gifts. What most consumers do not know is Poinsettias have to be grown with a lot of love and attention or they won’t make it to your holiday festivities.

Beets, parsnip, squash and apples

Being thankful for our families has a new meaning this year, and the feast should be spectacular. Let’s add a sometimes-missing ingredient this year: the love that a local grower, baker, or cook puts into their product.

My role in the Thanksgiving meal is to procure ingredients and I challenge myself to buy mostly fresh local ingredients for the big meal.