By now you may be getting tired of looking at your remaining spent plants or bare container gardens. Why not spruce them up for the winter with some greenery, twigs and other holiday decorations?

When designing my home landscape, I considered planting evergreens and shrubs that I could cut for use in my winter container garden designs. Not only do these types of plants provide interesting winter landscape characteristics, they also help me save money when it comes to incorporating greenery and twigs into my winter designs.

Welcome to my new blog! Thank you for showing interest.

I will be writing and posting photos about my seasonal landscape improvements here. Please contact me if you would like me to post on certain topics.

Hello all!

If you read my last post I was going to write about cutting and preserving herbs, but since the weather is still cooperating I wish to complete a different landscape task. The landscape improvement I decided to focus on this week is dividing peonies. If you are looking to divide your peonies, this should be done in the next week. September is typically a better time to divide peonies, but time just got away from me this season. Since it is very early in October and the weather is still quite warm, I went ahead and divided my peonies last weekend.

Now is the time to dig and store your tropical bulbs and bulb-like structures. Today I will be focusing on cannas (Photo 1), which has a rhizome structure. Although this is termed differently, these tropical plants should be treated as tender bulbs and should be dug up before the first killing frost.

The Weather Channel is predicting freezing temperatures this Friday night. Be sure to get outside while the weather is decent if you would like to save these tropical plants from the frigid temperatures that lie ahead.

I almost missed the window to overwinter my ornamental sweet potato vines. Luckily, so far in the Chicago region the temperature only hit a low of 35 degrees Fahrenheit. As you can see in Photo 1, the vines were only slightly damaged by this minor frost. In case you are curious as to the definition of a frost, the Illinois State Water Survey State Climatologist uses a temperature threshold of 32° for frost and 28° for a hard freeze.