Nut nutrition. With tips on shopping, storing, and cooking

Are you nuts for nuts? If so, you probably have some favorites. Maybe pecans or walnuts? Peanuts or almonds? Fortunately, no matter your favorites, nuts are a nutritious choice!

Nutritionally, 1/4 cup of just about any nut contains around 200 calories, 14-18g fat, 5-7g protein, 2-4g fiber, and are sources of vitamins and minerals including vitamin E, some B vitamins, magnesium, zinc, potassium, and iron. On their own, nuts are not a significant source of carbohydrates or sodium. 

Fresh beets with leaves and stems on granite background

My CSA (community supported agriculture) farmer offered me a bundle of small beets. For this CSA, I can pick from a variety of available foods each week. Beets are not a go-to food for me, but the registered dietitian in me enjoys learning about foods, so I took the beets home.

Picture of a lemon, lime, and orange on white background

Winter is the season for citrus fruits. Today, let's look at citrus that are available almost all year round in grocery stores: limes, lemons, and orange juice. For a long list naming other citrus fruits, along with shopping and storage tips for citrus fruits, check out How Many Citrus Fruits Can You Name?

Bowl of yellow split peas on blue background

Some foods I pick for blog posts are from my own curiosity of foods I have never cooked with much. In the case of this blog post, a fellow Extension educator made the request. She was working with a food pantry that had yellow split peas and wanted some recipe options for the pantry clients.

variety of citrus fruits, both whole and cut in half

Citrus is a big family, like apples. Let’s see how long of a list I can name: lemons, limes, navel oranges, grapefruit, ugli fruit, cara cara oranges, blood oranges, pomelos, tangerines, and mandarin oranges. 

While there are a lot of different types of citrus, nutritionally they are similar: a source of vitamin C, folate, potassium and other vitamins and minerals, a source of carbohydrates and fiber, and no significant amount of sodium, fat, or protein. One medium navel orange contains around 60 calories, 15g carbohydrates, and 3g fiber.

Dill coated white fish and asparagus on white plate and blue background

Dill is an interesting plant. In the kitchen, cooks have a choice of fresh and dried dill weed (the leaves) or dill seed for their recipes. Each provide their own flavors and preferred applications. Dill weed is generally more mild than the seeds, adds color to dishes, and provides better flavor when added towards the end of cooking. Dill seeds can stand up to long cooking times and tend to have a stronger flavor. From pickles to soups and salads to dips, dill is one versatile plant.

Nutrition

Three strips of jerky on white plate with blue background

Jerky is a dried meat product that comes in as many different flavors and uses as many different meats as you can probably think of. While jerky can be made at home, this post will focus on prepared jerky.

Nutrition

The nutrition of jerky will vary based on the type of protein used and any flavorings. For nutrition information on your specific jerky, check the food label.

Check out Parts 1 and 2 of this series for more. Part 1 covers an introduction to deer meat and flavors. Part 2 shares information on cooking with venison. And check out the recipes videos on social media.

Venison & Root Vegetable Stew (Serves 8)