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    Winter is the season for citrus fruits. Today, let's look at citrus that are available almost all year round in grocery stores: limes, lemons, and orange juice. For a long list naming other citrus fruits, along with shopping and storage tips for citrus fruits, check out How Many Citrus Fruits Can You Name?

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    Some foods I pick for blog posts are from my own curiosity of foods I have never cooked with much. In the case of this blog post, a fellow Extension educator made the request. She was working with a food pantry that had yellow split peas and wanted some recipe options for the pantry clients.

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    Citrus is a big family, like apples. Let’s see how long of a list I can name: lemons, limes, navel oranges, grapefruit, ugli fruit, cara cara oranges, blood oranges, pomelos, tangerines, and mandarin oranges. 

    While there are a lot of different types of citrus, nutritionally they are similar: a source of vitamin C, folate, potassium and other vitamins and minerals, a source of carbohydrates and fiber, and no significant amount of sodium, fat, or protein. One medium navel orange contains around 60 calories, 15g carbohydrates, and 3g fiber.

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    Dill is an interesting plant. In the kitchen, cooks have a choice of fresh and dried dill weed (the leaves) or dill seed for their recipes. Each provide their own flavors and preferred applications. Dill weed is generally more mild than the seeds, adds color to dishes, and provides better flavor when added towards the end of cooking. Dill seeds can stand up to long cooking times and tend to have a stronger flavor. From pickles to soups and salads to dips, dill is one versatile plant.

    Nutrition

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    Jerky is a dried meat product that comes in as many different flavors and uses as many different meats as you can probably think of. While jerky can be made at home, this post will focus on prepared jerky.

    Nutrition

    The nutrition of jerky will vary based on the type of protein used and any flavorings. For nutrition information on your specific jerky, check the food label.

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    Check out Parts 1 and 2 of this series for more. Part 1 covers an introduction to deer meat and flavors. Part 2 shares information on cooking with venison. And check out the recipes videos on social media.

    Venison & Root Vegetable Stew (Serves 8)

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    Partnerships are a big part of Illinois Extension programs.  This one started with a conversation about deer hunting and turned into recipe videos and a blog series.  So many ‘thank you’s to Sara Wade, MS, RD, LDN, with Kirby Medical Center for sharing her experiences.

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    There is a large variety of different radishes:  spicy to mild, small to long, round to straight, red to white to multicolored.  (A watermelon radish is a fun one to look at – and eat.)

    Nutrition

    A half cup of sliced raw radishes contains around 10 calories, 2g carbohydrates, and 1g fiber. Radishes do not contain much protein, fat, or sodium, and have vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, folate, potassium, and calcium.

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    Where do you often see paprika? Sprinkled on egg salad or cottage cheese? Added to a recipe like chicken paprikash for that red color?

    Paprika is made by drying and grinding varieties of mild red peppers. This powdered spice can be used to garnish foods and add color and unique flavors. A blend of different peppers creates the varieties, flavors, and heat levels of paprika you see on shelves, such as sweet paprika, Hungarian paprika, Spanish paprika, and smoked paprika.

    Nutrition

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    Last summer, our office bought a share of a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Each week of the season, we got a box of local fruits, veggies, and herbs. Garlic scapes were a unique addition one week.

    In his article, fellow UI Extension educator, Grant McCarty, shares that "garlic scapes are the immature, flowering stems of hardneck garlic." Scapes have a milder flavor than cloves of garlic, and can be used in place of garlic.

    Nutrition

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    Chickpeas or garbanzo beans? A different name for the same food, this member of the legume family has a firm texture and a nutty flavor that enhances a variety of recipes.

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    Part of the parsley family, cumin is an annual plant that produces seeds. These seeds can be used as a spice – often ground up – when cooking. To see cumin go from seed to powder, watch the short video, Grinding Cumin at The Spice House, from chicagospiceboss. Note that University of Illinois Extension provides this information for education and does not endorse any company, products, or services over another.

    Nutrition

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    For all the soybeans grown in Illinois, the Illinois Soybean Association notes, "Animal ag is the No. 1 customer for soybeans. Of the soybean meal fed in Illinois, pigs consume 74%, poultry 13%, and beef and dairy cattle 12%."

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    Due to technical difficulties, this event will be rescheduled to March 27.
     
    It's March! And it's National Nutrition Month!
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    It's March! And it's National Nutrition Month!  To celebrate, join us at noon CST for mini discussions throughout the month on Facebook LIVE.
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    It's March!
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    Pomegranates are simple looking on the outside, and offer an unexpected surprise inside. If you have never opened one, I encourage you to take a look.

    Nutrition

    A half cup of pomegranate arils – the seed and juice sacs – contains around 70 calories, 16g carbohydrates, 3g fiber, and 1g each of fat and protein. They also contain vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, folate, and vitamin K. Pomegranate is not a significant source of sodium.

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    Back in my college classes, we students had opportunities to be food scientists and modify recipes.  Since we were also nutrition and dietetic students, we were told to focus these modifications on ways to add nutrition, such as adding fiber, or improve the nutritional profile, such as lower sodium.

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    Any fans of spicy foods? January 16 is National Hot and Spicy Food Day.

    Red pepper flakes – or crushed red pepper – are a great way to add spice and heat to recipes. Red pepper flakes are dried hot peppers that are crushed into small pieces and served along with the seeds.

    Nutrition

    Red pepper flakes are very spicy, so the amount typically eaten is small. There are not significant calories, carbohydrates, fat, protein, or vitamins or minerals in a few shakes of red pepper flakes.