child with headphones on watching a tablet

We use technology in many ways during everyday routines, and young children don’t want to be left out. The University of Illinois Early Learning Project has a great tip sheet, Tech Time for Young Children, that shares some ways families and caregivers can find a healthy balance with technology and electronic media in their daily lives

view of someone in military boots standing behind child

While family members of our military service members do not actively serve, they do have a very important job – holding down the fort. Military service members put their lives on the line to protect and serve our country while their families adapt, miss their loved ones, and support them from home.

Man and boy fishing together at pond

With social isolation having such negative consequences on people and seeming to have increased especially with the COVID pandemic, I thought it would be good to share this article I originally wrote in 2018. When children, teens and younger adults spend time with older adults, there are many benefits to everyone involved. Older adults can be great role models for children, while also passing on family stories, historical information and teaching the rituals and traditions of earlier times.

man and woman pointing at each other and yelling

Growing up, my family had my half-sisters every other weekend, but the co-parenting relationship never took a break. I witnessed many different conversations between co-parents on many different topics like schooling, child support, drama, and even discipline. While the conversations were often filled with conflict, there was also supportive and healthy communication.

Man and woman shouting at each other.

“It’s your turn to take the kids to practice after school today,” she says to her husband.

“I can’t take the kids to practice today, I have a late meeting,” he says.

“That’s the second late meeting this week!” she shouts.

“Why are you raising your voice?” he asks as he points towards her.

“Why are you pointing at me?  You know it makes me crazy when you point at me!” she shouts.

“Crazy, you think my pointing is what makes you crazy? Ha!” he shouts in a smug tone.

two people sitting at a table talking

I originally wrote this article a few years ago, but always feel it is worthwhile to share it again periodically as a refresher. People are highly passionate in their beliefs and on behalf of groups they are a part of, and in our current culture, differing beliefs or create quite the stir. Difficult topics can make it a challenge to get our point across the way we intend to - whether we are talking with professionals, supervisors, family members or friends.

Man, woman and child playing on phone

The holidays are fast approaching, and what is usually a fun time of preparation and anticipation for many is now clouded by uncertainty with COVID-19. With the surge in cases and the severity of the disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, suggests celebrating Thanksgiving with members of your own household who consistently take measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19 or with others virtually to lower the risk of spread.

People with Alzheimer’s may have difficulties communicating. Alzheimer’s disease makes a person forgetful and confused.  

Here are some reasons people with Alzheimer’s may have difficulties communicating: