cover crop starting to grow in corn field in February

Ooooh that smell. Can’t you smell that smell (read to the tune of That Smell by Lynyrd Skynyrd). If you have been driving around the countryside recently, you might already know what I am talking about; however, for those of you that don’t, as the temperatures warm up, a foul smell may begin floating around select farmer’s fields. Some say it smells like a gas leak while others might give their vehicle companion a nasty look, but the true culprit is the radish.

Corn with yellow strips

Depending on your soil test results; nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are nutrients we supply year after year to our corn crop; however, there is a nutrient we might be overlooking when making fertilizer applications. Sulfur is considered the fourth most important nutrient needed by plants. With a reduction in sulfur emissions from industrial and transportation sources, atmospheric sulfur depositions are much lower which has led to an increase in sulfur deficient corn. It is important to adequately supply crops with sulfur to maintain a high yielding crop.